Past Exhibits

This archive is under construction – come back later to see what’s new.

  • Constant Background new prints by Bruce Edwards closing reception Tremont ArtWalk Friday June 13, 2014 - music by Dutch Babies

    Bruce Edwards received a BFA from Kent State University in 1991. He has shown extensively in Cleveland, most notably at SPACES, Zygote Press, The Center for Contemporary Art (now MOCA Cleveland), and Brandt Gallery. Edwards has been featured in the Performance art festival, and is held in several collections including the Progressive Collection. Edwards maintains a studio practice that includes photography, sculpture, and printmaking, in the treemont district of Cleveland. Edwards has been a faculty member of CIA, CCC, and UA, and currently serves on the Board of Zygote Press, a fine art print cooperative serving local, national, and international artists.

    About the Work

    There are thousands of hours that go into the set up and filming of just one short shot of a movie. The art director, the lighting designer, hair and makeup, costume, director of photography, all have an integral part to play in the movie product. It is with great admiration for the craft of film-making that I choose to use motion pictures as a source for my images. When watching a film the artistry can get lost in the blur of the narrative action as we get caught up in the characters and plot. Taking still images not only allows one to see and pay attention to the aspects of the shot, but also begin to see the relative similarities of all motion picture filming: the long shot, the pan, a love scene, the close up, etc. This is the language of film, but also the language of image. Images allow us to explore our own conceptual narratives. It is often said that a picture is worth a thousand words; this is because in our human quest to order our world we are prone to seeking explanations for all the things we see. We endeavor to categorize and correlate what we see against our already understood memories and conventions. In this way we extrapolate from our internal knowledge to assign meaning and order. These prints are meant to initiate an understanding and discovery of personal memory and narrative. They are also intended to expose the nature of screen-printing which employs a value scale with limited pallet. Each of these images is produced with only four colors, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black, a technique developed in the mid 20th century for mass production of the printed media, and still used today in desktop printers across the world. Whereas the printed image once ruled the mass media world, TV took over which is now being eclipsed by the small screen, computer and hand held devices.

    This work is nostalgic in many ways, the images come from a mid century movie shot on film, a disappearing media. The still is captured by camera directly from the television not through sampling of a video. The digital photo is translated with a computer into a form that can be printed by hand.

  • The Long Ease: post cancer works - collage by Phoebe Marie Nelson. April 2014

  • Phoebe Marie Nelson, “The Long Ease: Post-Cancer Works” April 11 - May 3, 2014

    April 11 – May 3, 2014
    Phoebe Marie Nelson, “The Long Ease: Post-Cancer Works”

    During the year of illness and literal bloodshed that led up to my diagnosis with inoperable Stage 2B Cervical Cancer on November 2, 2011, something was happening that I did not even realize. Or NOT happening, as it were. I stopped making art. It wasn’t a conscious decision, it just happened. I felt terrible and uninspired, stressed and filled with anxiety and panic. The artwork just ended. Shortly after the diagnosis and subsequent months of chemotherapy, radiation and brachytherapy, something else happened that I didn’t realize either. I started making art again. Quietly at first. Just a few pieces. And then a few more. And very slowly, over the past two years, I began to “ease” back into the life of a so-called artist again. It was a big deal for me.

    Cancer not only changed me physically – I was left infertile and menopausal at 36, not to mention a host of other late side effects and a permanent fear of recurrence – but it changed my artwork as well. I’ve done collage for over 20 years, and everyone who is familiar with my work has noticed the change. I don’t think this new series of work is “better” than what I used to do, but it is different. Lighter, yet more meaningful. More mature maybe? More hopeful? Maybe it’s just what happens to the things you make when you’ve been through something as life-altering as cancer in your 30s.

    Artwork still available – This show has sold fast and only a few pieces remain.

  • Work by Sarah Biscuso, March 14 - April 5, 2014

    “I am coming back to painting after a decade-long hiatus. When I paint, I am interested in memory, emotion, and spontaneity. I approach the canvas without primary sketches or concrete plans in an attempt to record ideas from below the conscious level. The work is a document of my experiences, interests, and state of mind at the point in my life when I created it. I have always been drawn to the Expressionist movement, and this influence is reflected in my work.”

  • Sarah Biscuso March 14 – April 5, 2014, opens Tremont ArtWalk Friday 6 – 10 p.m. DJ set by C Randolph C

    “I am coming back to painting after a decade-long hiatus. When I paint, I am interested in memory, emotion, and spontaneity. I approach the canvas without primary sketches or concrete plans in an attempt to record ideas from below the conscious level. The work is a document of my experiences, interests, and state of mind at the point in my life when I created it. I have always been drawn to the Expressionist movement, and this influence is reflected in my work.”

  • TWO YODY’S YODY/Examples/ YODY/Study in Nature: Rebecca Yody and Tom Yody, music by Librarian February 14th Tremont ArtWalk

    With over two decades of experience in performance and creative arts, Rebecca Yody is continuously striving to find new ways of expression. She has recently exhibited her work at SmartSpace and Two Girls from Cleveland / The FOUNDRY Store. Tom Yody taught at the Cooper School of Art in the 1970s and returned to Cleveland in 2012, invigorated by the thriving art scene and inspired by what he refers to as “the work-a-day, blue shirt commitment and dedication of the artists here.” In Fall 2013, Kenneth Paul Lesko Gallery exhibited Yody’s abstract drawing and sculptures evoking the non-representational surrealism of Yves Tanguy and the organic structures of Antonio Gaudi.

  • TWO YODYS - YODY/Examples/ YODY/Study in Nature: Rebecca Yody and Tom Yody February 8 – March 8, 2014


    With over two decades of experience in performance and creative arts, Rebecca Yody is continuously striving to find new ways of expression. She has recently exhibited her work at SmartSpace and Two Girls from Cleveland / The FOUNDRY Store. Tom Yody taught at the Cooper School of Art in the 1970s and returned to Cleveland in 2012, invigorated by the thriving art scene and inspired by what he refers to as “the work-a-day, blue shirt commitment and dedication of the artists here.” In Fall 2013, Kenneth Paul Lesko Gallery exhibited Yody’s abstract drawing and sculptures evoking the non-representational surrealism of Yves Tanguy and the organic structures of Antonio Gaudi.

  • Jeanette Thomas closing reception Saturday February 1, 7 - 10 p.m. music by Iron Oxide

    Work by Kat Stewart

    K. Stewart, "Pchyolka," latex on canvas, 2010

    Fundamentals of Engineering work by K. Stewart

    Since moving to Cleveland over 10 years ago, Stewart has played in several local bands (Black Cabbage, Iron Oxide, Mohammad Cartoon, Budapest Dojo). She works with paint, photography, fabric, and linotype, having last exhibited at the December 2012 Decay in Response: Pink Noise edition. A graduate of Cleveland State’s Electrical Engineering program, Stewart has a polymathic range of interests, from linguistics and graphic design to robotics and video games.

    Work by Jeanette Daphne Thomas

    Extended Family work by Jeanette Daphne Thomas

    Thomas studied at CSU for two years, followed by a brief stint at CIA. “Since then,” she writes, “I’ve made event fliers for my previous bands, made cover art for friends bands albums, including a 7-inch record for Herzog, released on the UK’s Transparent Records, and [for] my current band, The Very Knees. . . . Comic books got me into making art, and sustained me while keeping my form progressing. As far as portraiture, there is nothing more interesting or telling than the human face; it contains a world, as well as life’s secrets and mysteries, the universe in miniature.”

  • Dana Depew small works -Tremont ArtWalk Friday December 13th & Saturday December 14th

    Tremont ArtWalk Friday the 13th and 14th

    Small work: new amongst some old, $100 and under.

    Saturday December 7, 6 – 10 p..m
    Tremont ArtWalk Friday December 13, 6 – 10 p.m.
    Saturday December 14, Noon – 6 p.m.

  • The Pretentious Tremont Artists of the Literary Cafe November 2 – 30

    The Pretentious Tremont Artists of the Literary Cafe

    Opening Reception Sat. November 2, 6 – 10 p.m.
    runs through November 30

  • Latitudes and Longitudes work by Dott Schneider September 13 - October 19, 2013

  • Latitudes and Longitudes new work by DOTT SCHNEIDER w/ DJ Librarian Tremont ArtWalk Friday October 11th

    DOTT SCHNEIDER

    LATITUDES AND LONGITUDES

    runs through October 19th, gallery open Saturday Noon – 6 p.m.

    Of late my work has been about manipulating non-traditional materials as commentary on the physical place I am at any given time. Latitudes and Longitudes is is based on my two week transcontinental drive to study the living erosion of the United States.

    Mixed media artist, Dott von Schneider received her CEAP from the Ecole des Beaux-arts de Rouen in 1996. Her work has been exhibited internationally and featured in publications such as Kölnisch Rundshau, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland Magazine, Jane Magazine, Las Vegas City Life, Cleveland Scene, and Northern Ohio Live. Schneider holds her studio in Lakewood and lives there with her husband and their attack cats.

  • Relic by Katelynn Altgilbers opens Tremont ArtWalk Friday August 9th

    Born and raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Altgilbers earned BFAs from Cleveland Institute of Art and Ursuline College before relocating to the East Coast, earning her MFA from Montclair State University (NJ) and currently teaching at SUNY Old Westbury College on Long Island. “Relic” can be seen reworking the post-industrial ruin exhibiting widely in rustbelt galleries these days (see Anne Trubek’s review-essay in the last issue of CAN Journal). Yet, rather than thematizing human waste against a resilient natural backdrop, Altigebers’ work offers photo tableaus of small survivors of nature’s own vast havoc. She writes, “Some of the pieces are from the beach after hurricane Sandy,” for example, “a sea sponge covered in small coral” against “a damaged home after hurricane Sandy. . . . This work is a celebration of objects that survive time and trauma.”

  • Peter Seward • Seen/Unseen closing reception ArtWalk Friday July 12, 6 - 10 p.m. with music by Dutch Babies at 8 p.m.

    For the past five years, “Stealth Towers,” has been the subject of this inquiry, as real and imagined cell-phone towers are camouflaged as pine trees, church steeples, flag poles, barn silos, and totem poles. Depicted with traditional techniques, and with a nod to the Hudson River School style of painting, these works place communications infrastructure in a Romantic, sometimes religious, context.

    “My attempt is to seduce the viewer with a beautifully painted image, but then discover a betrayal with a narrative contrary to the original emotion. I’m as conflicted about living in the post-modern world as anyone else, and present these works as open-ended questions.”

    This new body of work looks at another current technological wonder framed against the sky: drone aircraft. The on-going quest to control the sphere geo-politically - black operations since the Cold War – continues as stealth drones dominate the skies over domestic and foreign lands. As unwitting ambassadors of American policy, drone planes demonstrate our reliance on technological solutions while, literally, being personally removed from the equation.

    “I’m hoping that the viewer considers this surveillance tool from another angle, by juxtaposing the invasiveness of remote technologies with pristine landscape and, sometimes, to explore stylization of the piece from a non-Western tradition.”

    peterseward.com

  • Peter Seward • Seen/Unseen, June 14, 6 – 10 p.m. opening and reception w/musical performance by Ryann Anderson

    For the past five years, “Stealth Towers,” has been the subject of this inquiry, as real and imagined cell-phone towers are camouflaged as pine trees, church steeples, flag poles, barn silos, and totem poles. Depicted with traditional techniques, and with a nod to the Hudson River School style of painting, these works place communications infrastructure in a Romantic, sometimes religious, context.

    “My attempt is to seduce the viewer with a beautifully painted image, but then discover a betrayal with a narrative contrary to the original emotion. I’m as conflicted about living in the post-modern world as anyone else, and present these works as open-ended questions.”

    This new body of work looks at another current technological wonder framed against the sky: drone aircraft. The on-going quest to control the sphere geo-politically - black operations since the Cold War – continues as stealth drones dominate the skies over domestic and foreign lands. As unwitting ambassadors of American policy, drone planes demonstrate our reliance on technological solutions while, literally, being personally removed from the equation.

    “I’m hoping that the viewer considers this surveillance tool from another angle, by juxtaposing the invasiveness of remote technologies with pristine landscape and, sometimes, to explore stylization of the piece from a non-Western tradition.”

    peterseward.com

  • Dott von Schneider – Latitudes and Longitudes September 13 – October 19

    A longtime Cleveland mixed media artist, Dott von Schneider received her CEAP from the Ecole des Beaux-arts de Rouen in 1996. Her work has been exhibited internationally and featured in publications such as Kölnisch Rundshau, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland Magazine, Jane Magazine, Cleveland Scene, and Northern Ohio Live. She also functions as Cultural Maraca and owner of Miller Schneider Gallery. She writes, “Of late my work has been about manipulating non-traditional materials as commentary on the physical place I am at any given time. Latitudes and Longitudes is based on my two week transcontinental drive to study the living erosion of the United States.”

  • Katelynn Altgilbers: Relic August 9 – September 7

    Born and raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Altgilbers earned BFAs from Cleveland Institute of Art and Ursuline College before relocating to the East Coast, earning her MFA from Montclair State University (NJ) and currently teaching at SUNY Old Westbury College on Long Island. “Relic” can be seen reworking the post-industrial ruin exhibiting widely in rustbelt galleries these days (see Anne Trubek’s review-essay in the last issue of CAN Journal). Yet, rather than thematizing human waste against a resilient natural backdrop, Altigebers’ work offers photo tableaus of small survivors of nature’s own vast havoc. She writes, “Some of the pieces are from the beach after hurricane Sandy,” for example, “a sea sponge covered in small coral” against “a damaged home after hurricane Sandy. . . . This work is a celebration of objects that survive time and trauma.”

  • Peter Seward • Seen/Unseen, June 14 - July 13, 2013

    In a series of landscape paintings, Seward explores our collective use of technology, set against our desire to preserve the natural environment.

    For the past five years, “Stealth Towers,” has been the subject of this inquiry, as real and imagined cell-phone towers are camouflaged as pine trees, church steeples, flag poles, barn silos, and totem poles. Depicted with traditional techniques, and with a nod to the Hudson River School style of painting, these works place communications infrastructure in a Romantic, sometimes religious, context.

    “My attempt is to seduce the viewer with a beautifully painted image, but then discover a betrayal with a narrative contrary to the original emotion. I’m as conflicted about living in the post-modern world as anyone else, and present these works as open-ended questions.”

    This new body of work looks at another current technological wonder framed against the sky: drone aircraft. The on-going quest to control the sphere geo-politically – black operations since the Cold War – continues as stealth drones dominate the skies over domestic and foreign lands. As unwitting ambassadors of American policy, drone planes demonstrate our reliance on technological solutions while, literally, being personally removed from the equation.

    “I’m hoping that the viewer considers this surveillance tool from another angle, by juxtaposing the invasiveness of remote technologies with pristine landscape and, sometimes, to explore stylization of the piece from a non-Western tradition.”

    peterseward.com

  • Closing Reception Tremont ArtWalk Friday May 10, music by Dutch Babies at 8:30 p.m.

    Closing Reception Tremont ArtWalk Friday May 10 6 – 10 p.m.

    Broken and picked over .. left as only a whisper in the wind … where fragments of the past lay, new life sprouts through reminding us that eventually mother earth will reclaim what was once hers. Sometimes we must go back to go forward.

    Location: Randali Park Mall, North Randall OH

    Bio: Bradley Miller. Bradley was born to a single mother’ in the summer of 1984 and has been an artist for as long as he can remember. After graduating high schooL his run-ins with the law and struggles with addiction landed him in the “clink’” ‘for several years providing an intense period of intellectual stimulation and some serious soul searching. After his release he attended Youngstown State University and later Cleveland State University studying fine art and photography. Today he is a proud father, an almost husband and has a promising future in both the culinary and photography fields.

  • Broken, and picked over . . . opens ArtWalk Friday April 12th

    Broken, and picked over . . . photography by Bradley Miller

    Opening Reception Tremont ArtWalk Friday April 12 6 – 10 p.m.

    Broken and picked over .. left as only a whisper in the wind … where fragments of the past lay, new life sprouts through reminding us that eventually mother earth will reclaim what was once hers. Sometimes we must go back to go forward.

    Location: Randali Park Mall, North Randall OH

    Bio: Bradley Miller. Bradley was born to a single mother’ in the summer of 1984 and has been an artist for as long as he can remember. After graduating high schooL his run-ins with the law and struggles with addiction landed him in the “clink’” ‘for several years providing an intense period of intellectual stimulation and some serious soul searching. After his release he attended Youngstown State University and later Cleveland State University studying fine art and photography. Today he is a proud father, an almost husband and has a promising future in both the culinary and photography fields.

  • All-Acoustic AVB Video Extravaganza Saturday February 23, 4 – 7 p.m.

    All-Acoustic AVB Video Extravaganza

    Live Bait Recording Foundation and Brandt Gallery present
    VIDEO SCREENING from Audio Visual Baptism #13 “All-Acoustic”
    held February 21, 2010 (almost three years ago)

    In addition to a POWERSTRIP OF CROCKPOTS (additions welcome), we’ll be featuring video of performances by:

    Ghostpussy
    Beard of Chipmonks
    slMakita
    Michael James
    Tempered Decay (featuring Steve Petrus)
    Tom Orange
    Jack Smiley
    Temple Fugate
    A Gaze Blank & Pitiless (feat. Roman J)
    Dead Peasant Insurance
    Fluxmonkey
    Throbbing Griswold

    Additional video surprises from the LBRF archives will be screened!

  • Autism: A Mexican Adventure by Craig Matis opens ArtWalk Friday March 8 runs through April 4, 2013

    Autism: A Mexican Adventure by Craig Matis opens ArtWalk Friday March 8 runs through April 4, 2013

    This book installation exhibition at the Brandt Gallery, “Autism: A Mexican Adventure” is a series of panels which relate the story of an American father and his autistic son traveling through Mexico to help cope with his wife’s death. Using music, narration, and a mixed media technique of folded paper and 3-D pencil drawings, the story describes a surreal journey that invites the viewer to learn a little about the difficulties in raising a special needs child, all set in a Mexican landscape.

  • Shadows: Photography by David Novak and Celebrate 20 Years of Tremont ArtWalk, Fri. Feb. 8 – Councilman Joe Cimperman presentation at 6 p.m.


    David Novak began photography in the 9th grade when he found an old Brownie camera in the family’s basement complete with film.  He took pictures of his sister (then twelve) and her new kitten, had the film developed, and found there were pictures on that same roll of film from when his sister was six. Like a Twilight Zone episode, he had stepped back in time and was instantly hooked.

    Following up on the Euclid Park Beach photographs he took with the 201 Minolta he got in college and exhibited at Brandt Gallery in 2010, Novak’s new exhibit explores shadows in the digital age. Noting that “digital color is so honest, it can be unforgiving,” Novak explores how the shadows so integral to the black-and-white medium of 50 years ago return to impact the digital print.

  • Nancy Prudic, “Exchange: Visibility/Invisibility” (November 9 – December 22)

    Nancy Prudic, “Exchange: Visibility/Invisibility” (November 9 – December 22)

    Nancy Prudic is associate professor of visual arts at Lake Erie College and has worked at the Cleveland Museum of Art in the Department of Education and Public Programming for eighteen years.
    Prudic believes that art is informed by the questions one asks oneself. Throughout her career a recurring theme has been personal image and “How is it formed?” As a woman she naturally questions the issues of the female body image and perception, both personal and social that affect one’s sense of self.
    This installation is intended as work in progress, as society’s perceptions as well as one’s self-image change over time.

  • Object of Beauty work by Cynthia Penter and Michelle Marie Murphy runs through November 3rd

    Photo video exhibition by Michelle Marie Murphy and Cynthia Penter

    What contemporary advertising and media culture continues to broadcast as acceptable and expected in female appearance, gives these artists the material to examine the motivations of the wearer and the observer of beauty standards, treatments, and products. This multimedia exhibit explores opposing positions in the relationship between consumption and rebellion of these ideals.

    Producing macro close-ups of the adorned, treated body and beauty “tools,” Murphy and Penter shift the gaze from the female as a subject to over-the-counter beauty maintenance products. The repeated forms magnify the subject creating optical plays for the viewer to discern. The resulting images blend perceptual space and our cultural space, revealing the image of beauty as both an idealized abstraction and socially constructed consumable obsession.

    The subject matter will center around mostly women and the actual objects to which they will relate. Posturing what does the audience bring to the idea of beauty, and whether the observer or the creator is more controlling of the notion of what passes as beauty or not.

  • A Night of Words and Music, Wednesday, October 3, 7 – 10 p.m.

    Craig R. Chojnicki invites you to A Night of Words and Music.
    Wednesday October 3, 7:00pm until 10:00pm.
    Frass Accolades, I Love You, Steven Goldberg, Matt Cassidy/ Sam Harmon Duo.

  • The Wilma Smith Project by Dana Depew, ArtWalk reception Friday September 14th 6 – 10 p.m.

    The Wilma Smith Project

    Dana Depew: I grew up on a farm in Medina, Ohio during the 1980’s. In essence, I grew up with Wilma Smith. Since 1977, when I was only five years old, Wilma has provided northeast Ohio with the daily news. That is quite an accomplishment with so many anchors that have come and gone in that time but Wilma has been a constant and has remained.

    The work that I do is highly reliant upon concept, making fleeting ideas come to fruition, and the nostalgia of childhood memories. I think Dick Goddard gets a lot of well-deserved credit for his longevity in his field but I personally feel Wilma Smith has also held her own as an anchor for thirty plus years in the same market and she does not nearly get the same credit. This lead to the idea of creating an exhibition based on Wilma Smith and creating a body of work that would pay homage to her continued service to our community.

    Wilma’s daily attire served as great subject matter to several works that will be exhibited. She states she is aware that people watch every day to see what necklace she has on, and she has fun trying to find new ones. “It’s an easy way to change an outfit. Clothes are so expensive and you usually only see from the waist up anyway. It could be the same blouse or the same suit, but the necklace is different.” I felt that I could create works loosely based on her daily accessories.


    Among the many awards and citations Smith has achieved, Smith is the recipient of 10 local Emmy Awards for excellence in her television work. She was voted “Cleveland’s Most Watchable Woman” by local viewers and “Best Anchorperson in Cleveland” in a poll of more than one million voters.

    Additionally, has also been voted “Anchor of Excellence” by the National Association of Career Women, “Newscaster of the Year,” a “Cleveland Pacesetter” and “Best Anchorperson” by Cleveland Magazine, and she is a member of the Ohio Television/Radio Hall of Fame. Wilma appeared on the cover of Cleveland Magazine five times.
    As well I have several conceptual projects pertaining to the exhibit to honor Wilma Smith that I am exploring. I would like to lobby Joe Cimperman and Frank Jackson in creating a declaration that would recognize Sept 8, 2012 as honorary “Wilma Smith Day”

  • Sirens and Other Wonders of the Sea – work by Meredith Hahn, August 10 – August 31, 2012

  • Sirens and Other Wonders of the Sea by Meredith Hahn opens Friday August 10th


    Sirens and other wonders of the sea is a series of work by local artist Meredith Hahn that illuminates the mythological figures of the deep blue. Her use of delicate strings of line parred with neon fills and metallic backgrounds capture your eye and don’t let go. Her first solo show at Brandt Gallery in Tremont, she welcomes you to view her new collection on Friday, August 10th 2012.

    The show runs through September 1st.

  • Two Cannons and an Icon July 13 - August 3, 2012

    Untitled photograph by Barbara Merritt

    Two Cannons and an Icon

    Photography by Barbara Merritt, David Szekeres and Munroe Copper

    Music provided by Librarian

    July 13 – August 4, 2012

    Three long time friends and artists that have been a part of Tremont art scene for over twenty years come together in this exhibit that seeks to explore each of their own uses of photography in their artistic endeavors.
    Ever since she was gifted a Pentax K1000 in 1994, Merritt’s conscious life has been driven by the world of photographic imagery. Immediately, the science and manipulation of film chemistry and the philosophy of imagery had her hooked. Although she has never worked within the moving picture genre, she is continually mesmerized by it. This series is a short story. The viewer will inevitably fill in the blank spots with their own creativity.
    Szekeres has had three solo exhibits at Brandt Gallery since his first in 2000, Only in My Dreams. Of that body of work, he says that he “delved into my memory bank of images I had seen or experienced in dreams. This provoked more emotional reaction than I had expected.” While Szekeres began his fine art exhibiting with a mix of drawings and paintings, he eventually found that he began to first take a manipulated photograph of what he wished to paint. He has moved on towards also showing his photography as its own exhibit.
    Tremont resident Munroe Copper has show extensively in Tremont. While some 20 years ago he showed much sculpture, in recent years he has moved more towards his photography. His maritime photos are often displayed at Grumpy’s. For this exhibit Copper is experimenting with various images and scale of reproduction. In a word, BIG.

  • It’s Not Your Fault – installation by Melanie Newman and Terry Durst Opens ArtWalk Friday June 8, 6 – 10 pm, runs through July 7th

    Cleveland artists Melanie Newman and Terry Durst met as bartenders at the Beachland Ballroom. One night last year, right before the doors opened, they came up with a great idea for an installation and began brainstorming.

    Melanie and Terry want you to know that It’s Not Your Fault.

    Terry is a Brandt Gallery veteran, having shown his work here for about 10 years through the nineties. This show will be Melanie’s first time working in the space, although she is familiar with Tremont as her first show post BFA graduation from CIA was hosted by the Doubting Thomas Gallery.

    A video of the exhibit can be found here.

  • Brandt Gallery – Tom Orange’s Spring Review

    In addition to a great summer lineup with established and emerging Cleveland artists showing work in a variety of media, the past few months have seen Brandt Gallery play host to a variety of art openings, literary and musical events.
    In February that gallery featured A Guide to Science by Jeff Curtis and Craig Martin. Childhood friends from Toledo, Jeff and Craig were also fellow visual arts students and active musicians at Kent State in the 1980s. While both have remained active visual artists since then, neither had exhibited their work in over ten years. A Guide to Science found Curtis and Martin incorporating iconic images of technology and innovation derived in part from popular science encyclopedias and comic strips, weaving these drawn and painted images into distinct yet complimentary styles that provoked humor, mystery and wonder. Opening and closing receptions also featured musical performances by Iron Oxide (Curtis’ long-time duo with Kat Stewart) as well as Martin’s own acoustic guitar songcraft.

    Daiv Whaley’s “Instant Impressionism: Automatic Paintings the Polaroid Way” brought an unexpected and welcome spot of color to a cold early Spring Brandt Gallery opening in March. Taking polaroid closeups of flowers, Whaley manipulates the film as it develops as well as in the process of transferring the prints to acetate sheets. The results combined sharp and vibrant colors with with blurred edges of deep focus to create a neo-retro twist on a classic painterly style.

    Rounding out the Spring calendar was Buddies by Justin Brennan. Ostensible portraits of pairs (and occasionally trios) of friends, Brennan’s canvases invariably evoked comments on contemporary social relations as well: “I use flat saturated color in most of my work,” Brennan stated, “because this is how I see our world and society; plainly, dismally, and vividly.” The cartoon-like portraits are often quite humorous as well, the blank looks and cheshire grins of these ”buddies” staring at us as a reminder of the tragic-comic sense of life. Brennan’s closing reception on a glorious pre-summer May evening featured a sidewalk performance by Team of Rivals, a garage punk rock quartet with over 20 years of street cred in the Cleveland/Akron/Kent music scenes (including The Heathers, Dead Federation, Missile Toe, Zero Defex, CD Truth, Numbskull, Starvation Army, Oral Authority, Pestilence and the SLAP Jazz Trio). Gina Muscatello (vocals), Jeff Hardy (guitar), Mike Zubal (bass) and John Henry Scully (drums) rocked
    the street, with more than one unsuspecting Artwalk patron drawn by sounds and the crowd that filled neighboring sidewalks, driveways andcurb lawns.

    Always presenting opportunities for a variety of the lively arts,
    Brandt Gallery continues to host poetry and music on regular and irregular bases. Russell Vidrick’s monthly Open Mic Poetry series has been held the second Saturday of every month at Brandt for over six years now and has a wide reputation for being truly open: no formal introductions, no sign-up sheets. Just bring some poems, your own or others’, and jump in whenever there’s a break in the proceedings.

    There are usually taste treats as well: Charlotte Mann often brings wine and chocolate, and Kathy Smith has been bringing some killer baked goods as of late. Another poetry group meets at the Gallery on fourth Saturdays, formerly called Rufus and now christened Nufus (or sometimes Rufus/Nufus). Kimberly Diamond spearheads this project, founded by her with Wendy Shaffer and Blayne Hoerner  a workshop where poets bring copies of draft poems and actively seek comments and suggestions from their peers.  The two poetry events compliment each other wonderfully, as a poem workshopped at Rufus/Nufus often get a new airing at Vidrick’s Open Mic the next month.

    On the music front, longtime Tremont resident Criag Chojnicki brought an unexpected treat to the Brandt Gallery on Friday May 4. Keir Neuringer, an Ithaca, NY based songwriter and instrumentalist, came to town for his third visit. Audiences were blown away by his previous shows at Bela Dubby, which combined virtuoso extended technique tenor saxophone playing with impassioned poetic recitations railing against the injustices of capitalist oppression overtop hypnotic tribal drum beats. This time, Keir also added dark and sometimes ironic pop tunes rendered on keyboards, drums and vocals in a one-man band effect.
    Chojnicki himself opened the proceedings with the recitation of a political poem with menacing electronics underneath. The duo of David Imburgia and Tom Orange also performed, starting with droning keyboards from the storefront window before moving to guitar (Imburgia) and drums (Orange) and finishing the set with some free jazz/rock improv.

  • Buddies work by Justin Brennan – Closing Reception ArtWalk Friday May 11th, Team of Rivals special performance

    I deal with raw human emotion that is often represented through figures, abstract portraits, or completely abstract images. I use flat saturated color in most of my work because this is how I see our world and society; plainly, dismally, and vividly.  Human emotions are the focus of my work, although the content is sometimes revealed to me after the pieces are completed.

    I am influenced by the skateboard and outsider art that surrounded me in my adolescence growing up in Cleveland, Ohio.  Other strong influences include urban art and any sort of Abstract Expressionism.

    The members of Team of Rivals hail from the following bands:  The Heathers, Dead Federation, Missile Toe, Zero Defex, CD Truth, Numbskull, Starvation Army, Oral Authority, Pestilence and the SLAP Jazz Trio.  Gina Muscatello on Vocals, Jeff Hardy on Guitar, Mike Zubal on Bass and John Henry Scully on Drums have been part of

    the Cleveland/Akron/Kent Garage/Punk music scene for over 20 plus years.  The band was formed in 2011 for the sake of those who do not drink tea before, during or after a gig.

  • Friday May 4th, An Evening of Words and Music – Keir Neuringer, Davide Andras Imburgia/Tom Orange Duo C. Randolph C.

    Keir Neuringer (Ithaca, NY)

    Davide Andras Imburgia/Tom Orange Duo

    C. Randolph C.

    And Evening of Words and Music, Friday May 4th beginning at 7:30 p.m.

    “Keir Neuringer composes & improvises acoustic & electronic music, writes socio-political performance texts & essays, & creates interdisciplinary artworks, all with the aim of bringing audiences into a state of emotional & intellectual curiosity that meets the conditions for meaningful dialogue with, & transformation of, the culture at large. Over the last 25 years he has cultivated a personal & intensely physical approach to solo saxophone improvisation that honors & builds upon diverse music-making traditions. He also plays analogue electronics & farfisa organ, & sings & narrates text. He has been an active participant in the experimental music scenes in Krakow, The Hague, and Amsterdam, and currently lives in Central New York.”

    http://keirneuringer.com/about.html

  • Instant Impressionism- Automatic Paintings the Polaroid Way work by Daiv Whaley opening reception Friday March 9, 6 – 10 p.m.

    Instant Impressionism- Automatic Paintings the Polaroid Way

    Work by Daiv Whaley

    I find myself working in several mediums depending on the need for certain technologies. Polaroid photography, on the other hand, is simply a love—a joy and a love of ‘accidentally’ capturing some perfect moment of beauty in the natural world and watching it develop before my eyes. It’s like the toy prize in the bottom of the Cracker Jacks box, like the B-side single you’ve never heard from a favorite band.

    Flowers are amazing creations—their colors, shapes and sizes suggest explosions out of the earth—floral fireworks. Again, their organic systems—building themselves up out of the ground from tiny seeds and synthesizing energy out of pure sunlight, water and soil—make them amazing machines and self-building architectures. Good designs from the greatest Designer!

    My Polaroids are attempts to fuse a sci-fi aesthetic to natural beauty. Using angles, close-up shots, light intensity, intentional blurriness, as well as my own manipulations of the film as the pictures develop, I strive to create a modern or even futuristic feeling with each photograph – more how paintings affect me and feel to me. The title of each piece also contributes to this aesthetic, since words are very important. Interestingly, each year color becomes more and more important in this collection – more painterly, as if the Polaroids are becoming automatic paintings of sorts, which is where the title for this exhibit originates.

    These selections have been compiled from a 19-year ongoing project, learning how to get instant film to express my feelings. Bright & beautiful open edition prints, I hope you enjoy this fun method for capturing light and color

    Daiv Whaley, March 2012

    ***

    Daiv Whaley studied Writing, Journalism & English Literature at Kent State University. Although active in graphic arts in high school, it was not until residing in the art dorm at university that he began to catch the art bug, promoting local punk shows and then God through flyers he stapled around campus. Stints living in Chicago and the Cleveland/Akron area exposed him to artists like Dan Flavin, Marc Chagall, Barb Kruger, Gerhard Richter and Andy Warhol. Working in several mediums – Polaroid and cell phone photography, propaganda, light & sound works, Eco-art and performance, Whaley has shown at Lake Erie College, the Beck Center for the Arts, ROY G. BIV (Columbus), Asterisk Gallery, Akron Public Library, Ingenuity Festival, First Night Akron, ASAP (Chicago), Art Metro, Brandt Gallery, North Water Street Gallery (Kent), Zombo Gallery (Pittsburgh), and the Second Floor Gallery (Chicago), among others. He has curated several exhibits in Cleveland galleries and performed in a self-produced cable access TV program, at the Cleveland International Performance Festival, with GROOP at Spaces Gallery, and at the Mattress Factory and Chicago’s Fringe Festival in support of Kristen Baumlier.      His favorite influences are God, nature, Rock & Roll, Sci-Fi and language. Whaley is also a culture journalist and is at work on his first comic book story.

  • Live Music Saturday March 3rd at 7 p.m – A GUIDE TO SCIENCE work by Jeff Curtis and Craig Martin – closing reception, 7 – 9 p.m.

    A GUIDE TO SCIENCE – closing reception Saturday March 3, 7 – 9 p.m.

    The artists: Jeff and Craig will perform for you.

    Performances include:

    Singer/Songwriter Craig Martin

    Acoustic Set – Jeff Curtis and Tom Orange

    Iron Oxide

    and a special guest Craig Chojnicki doing the things only Craig can!

  • A Guide to Science work by Jeff Curtis and Craig Martin opening Friday February 10, 6 – 10 p.m.

    Light and Vision by Jeff Curtis

    Incorporating words, phrases, and lettering as an intrinsic part of the visuals in my drawings, I am influenced by the history of graphic design as a means of visual communication, and further using visual representations of language as a means of enhancing, augmenting, and sometimes subverting verbal expression.  My reinterpretations of classic book covers and elements from the books themselves give me a chance to explore the processes of graphic design, and to draw out my own subjective reactions and extrapolations of these works of popular culture.

    Opening Night performance by Iron Oxide.

  • Cleveland School – January 13 through February 4

    St Malachi by Ora Coltman

    The Cleveland School has garnered attention over the years for the turn of the century painters it produced and influenced throughout the midwest/Great Lakes region of the United States.    The WPA Projects employed some of these artists, work by Ora Coltman is still on display at the main branch of the City of Cleveland Library.

    The Cleveland School eventually became the Cleveland Institute of Art.

    This exhibit contains work by three Cleveland School painters, as well as of several paintings subsequent to the Cleveland School period.

  • Thing of Color work by Bruno Casiano

    Hombre painting by Bruno Casiano

    As a child growing up in the Island of Puerto Rico, I encountered the wild rural life of a small town called Juana Diaz. Since, this has been the motivating factor of my artwork, composed of sub-conscience interpretations of mountains, mangos, ceiba trees, caves and the awareness of being on an island. This is the key part of the process of my work, which dips into these memories seen through the eyes of a young kid, where depth of a brilliant sky becomes entangled with leaves, branches, water, colors, forms and high contrast.

    This euphoria of the creative process finds the measuring place in the tangible material. Two parallels, man and material interact concurrent to such objective, called art. The complexity of its continuous resurrection repeats itself in many stages throughout the entire existence in which materials are being manipulated. By these undetermined or determined allusions, composed by the surreal and real, singular and plural thoughts which constantly recall stages of  my human experience.

    This subjectivity and visual pursuit for the “truth” is which gives birth to the process and creation, and continues to break esthetic interpretations, which results into my final art work.

  • Thing of Color work by Bruno Casiano, music provided by DJ C. Randolph C. Artist reception this Friday for Tremont’s ArtWalk

    As a child growing up in the Island of Puerto Rico, I encountered the wild rural life of a small town called Juana Diaz. Since, this has been the motivating factor of my artwork, composed of sub-conscience interpretations of mountains, mangos, ceiba trees, caves and the awareness of being on an island. This is the key part of the process of my work, which dips into these memories seen through the eyes of a young kid, where depth of a brilliant sky becomes entangled with leaves, branches, water, colors, forms and high contrast.

    This euphoria of the creative process finds the measuring place in the tangible material. Two parallels, man and material interact concurrent to such objective, called art. The complexity of its continuous resurrection repeats itself in many stages throughout the entire existence in which materials are being manipulated. By these undetermined or determined allusions, composed by the surreal and real, singular and plural thoughts which constantly recall stages of  my human experience.

    This subjectivity and visual pursuit for the “truth” is which gives birth to the process and creation, and continues to break esthetic interpretations, which results into my final art work.

  • Thing of Color work by Bruno Casiano opens Friday November 11th

    As a child growing up in the Island of Puerto Rico, I encountered the wild rural life of a small town called Juana Diaz. Since, this has been the motivating factor of my artwork, composed of sub-conscience interpretations of mountains, mangos, ceiba trees, caves and the awareness of being on an island. This is the key part of the process of my work, which dips into these memories seen through the eyes of a young kid, where depth of a brilliant sky becomes entangled with leaves, branches, water, colors, forms and high contrast.

    This euphoria of the creative process finds the measuring place in the tangible material. Two parallels, man and material interact concurrent to such objective, called art. The complexity of its continuous resurrection repeats itself in many stages throughout the entire existence in which materials are being manipulated. By these undetermined or determined allusions, composed by the surreal and real, singular and plural thoughts which constantly recall stages of  my human experience.

    This subjectivity and visual pursuit for the “truth” is which gives birth to the process and creation, and continues to break esthetic interpretations, which results into my final art work.

    Bruno

  • Tremont History Project – Tremont ArtWalk Friday October 14th

    The Tremont History Project will be kicking off its fall schedule at Brandt Gallery.   The history project consists of people with a little more history in Tremont than ArtWalk and Tremont West.   This is an on-going project, photos and events are always being added to the timeline, as they work to vet out the rich 150 year history of this always diverse, and until quite recently, blue collar working class neighborhood.

    The history project will be featured at Pilgrim Congregational Church for the  November ArtWalk.

  • BRANDT21 poetry reading, barbecue/potluck Saturday October 8th

    Saturday October 8 the monthly Russell Vidrick open mic poetry will feature the contributors to his BRANDT21 poetry anthology published in conjunction with the BRANDT21 anniversary show.

    Poetry begins at 3 p.m.

    Barbecue begins at 5 p.m. we supply fire and some light beverages, you bring food for the grill and to share!

  • Brandt21 runs through October 8

    This year marks the 21st anniversary of Brandt Gallery, one of the first and longest running art galleries in the Tremont neighborhood. In recognition of Jean Brandt’s ongoing dedication and promotion of area artists and the Tremont Artwalk, Dana Depew and Steven Mastroianni have organized a retrospective of artists who have shown at Brandt gallery.

    Brandt Gallery (1028 Kenilworth) Saturday September 17,   Noon – 6 p.m.

    Mastroianni Arts (2688 West 14th Street) Saturday September 17  Noon – 3 p.m.

    Participating artists:

    Robert Banks
    Emily Blaser
    Judith Brandon
    Justin Brennan
    Beth Bryan
    Preston Buchtel
    Milenko Budimir
    Vincent Como
    Pete Dell
    Denver Dell
    Dana Depew
    Stephe DK
    Pamela Dodds
    Lauren Dombrowiak
    Terry Durst
    Bruce Edwards
    Mona Gazala
    Collette Gschwind
    Jacci Hammer
    Tim Herron
    Sally Hudak
    Christopher Kapsar
    Matk Keffer
    Kenn Louis
    Mikel Mahoney
    Charlotte Mann
    Jerry Mann
    Steven Mastroianni
    Shawn Mishak
    Michelle Marie Murphy
    David Novak
    Phoebe Marie Nelson
    Tom Orange
    Anastasia Pantsios
    Ben Parsons
    Cynthia Penter
    Scott Pickering
    Nancy Prudic
    John Ranally
    Jayce Renner
    Victoria Semarjian
    Edward Shalala
    David Skutnik
    Kathy Smith
    Steven B Smith
    Steve Stanaszek
    David Szekeres
    Dan Tranberg
    Terri P Tufts
    Russell Vidrick
    Laila Voss
    Daiv Whaley
    Jessica Wheelock
    Maria Winiarski
    Beth Yurich
    Larry Zuzik

    Exhibit runs through the month at both galleries.

  • IN AND OUT OF SHADOW – New work by TERRI P TUFTS, August 6 – 27, 2011

    Chamomile Blossoms

    ArtWalk Friday August 12, 6 – 10 pm,  ARTIST RECEPTION Saturday August 13, 6 -10 pm

    IN AND OUT OF SHADOW

    New work by Terri P Tufts

    I am very grateful to Jean Brandt for asking me to show at her gallery.  Many thanks to Preston Buchtel for his support and technical advice, and for helping me to hang all of this.  Preston is also responsible for the backward ticking clock on ENTROPY one-five-six.  Thanks also to Deidre Lauer who is helping me to entertain at the Literary after the artist reception.

    I have been working as an Artist, Decorative Painter, Interior Decorator, Scenic Artist/Designer along with many other odd and varied project that have come my way since graduating from The Cleveland Institute of Art in 1988.  I currently own a business called Art Crimes Inc.  with a thankful nod to the Artist STEVEN SMITH for the obvious inspiration for the name.  Although I didn’t remember until it was recently pointed out to me so thanks Steven!

    I currently operate my business and studio out of a pole barn in my back yard in Eaton Township where I live.

    I have always been pictorially motivated.  Each of these pieces began with a distinct idea in mind.  Some begin with a poem or phrase.  Others begin with a concept but no images or words.  Some are just emotions or feelings that I would like to express.  It gets difficult at times to create a visual image out of nebulous feeling.  I have a story to tell but have decided to release myself from my pictorial tendencies a bit.  I was able to do this with poetry, phrases and words within the work.  I felt the freedom and moved more towards my expressionistic, symbolist imagery, in conjunction with my pictorial tendencies.  All of the pieces are about personal experience, losses, feelings and interests.

    And as “they” say

    PAINT WHAT YOU KNOW

    That I have done

    I love to experiment with different material and I often call my studio or wherever I happen to set up my work space, “my laboratory”.  The pieces in this show have a very definite structure and hanging system. I am quite enamored of structural systems. “Form follows Function” is apt on many occasions.  The rust belt, decay, along with the beautiful and varied landscape, harsh and wonderful weather of the Cleveland area has shaped vision in a way I could never have predicted as a child living in Southern California.

    I am used to working quite large and am often design large spaces and have had to modify the work somewhat.  In fact, the show almost became “In the Dryer” as everything is a little smaller than usual ie: shrunk in the dryer, and probably should have remained so.  But here we are.  I have some rather serious tendencies in my art and often dwell on darkness.  I have tried to be more playful with ENTROPY one-five-sic and let my humor come through even though it deals with a serious and emotional topic and is very complex on many personal levels.  I become much attached to my art and have a hard time letting go. It makes selling a very difficult proposition.  I am trying to remake myself with ENTROPY.  Its sole purpose and concept is to disperse into the world and increase its entropy.

    In spite or because of all this, I am a rather happy and optimistic person.  Perhaps delving in the dark helps me to cope with life’s tragedies and disappointment small or large. I have always believed that hard honest work with purpose and integrity matters.  Meaningful relationships cure a lot of ails.  Boredom is a disease and moving forward is the cure,  Or just moving sometimes.

  • Ricerca dell’amore (searching for love) new works by ElizaBETH ROSS YURICH, June 4 – July 2, 2011

    A visual exploration into social media+texting+cell phones and its effects on relationships.

  • Waiting for the Moment Before new work by Preston Buchtel, May 6 – May 30, 2011

    This is Preston’s second solo exhibition at Brandt Gallery, his first show of paintings and collages was presented in February of 2000.

    His artist statement for this show is presented below:

    An exhibition of digitally assembled photographic collages.

    I began exploring digital photo manipulation in an effort to see what it had to offer me and my work, and how I might use it as a medium for expression. I also wanted to find a way of working with it as intuitively and with the same immediacy that my paintings and physical collages offered.

    What I find most interesting about this medium, is the ability it offers to layer multiple images and fragments, and control their degree and manner of integration with one another, thus offering many possibilities for the visual creation, destruction, and manipulation of space, time, form, meaning, narrative, and perception. Through which new totalities can be constructed.

    Several years and over 10,000 collages later, this exhibition includes some of the results.

  • Apophenia Immaculate: AI for Shortening – David Sulik, March 11 – April 8, 2011

    David Sulik is a traditionally trained artist who became interested in the computer and its possibilities as an art tool while establishing himself in Cleveland after graduating from The Cleveland Institute of Art in 1984 with a degree in Drawing; double minor in Painting and Silversmithing. During 2005 – 2007 he returned to school to obtain a Master degree in Digital Arts. He now creates with the computer, less restrained by the limitations of the physical world.

    The representations here, inspired by current ideas about quantum physics, molecular biology, brain wave patterns, Wake Induced Lucid Dreaming and environment cognition, are developed as 2D and 3D computer models. Some are utilized in live time computer simulation animations. To achieve that, an interactive 3D program produces frame-by frame images of pre-calculated mathematical forms discoverable by the viewer during live time using a hand held radio control method.

    Artist selected FramePrints of virtual viewpoints, in the same manner that traditional artists select a view when painting a landscape, are also produced as part of an apophenia process to provoke thought and discussion.

  • April in February work by Larry Zuzik, February 11 – March 5, 2011

    April in February

    I have a BFA in studio art from Kent State University (1980). I also acquired an ohio k-12 visual arts teaching certificate from Cleveland State University (2002), (although I never got a teaching job).

    I have worked as a portrait artist in Hawai’i and Holland. I enjoy life drawing and portraiture which I do weekly with fellow artists for many years now.I have had one gallery show and occasionally show in group exhibitions. I work as a landscaper in cleveland hts. and currently live in s. euclid, ohio with my two new cats blondie and van.

    Artist’s statement:

    Mostly I’ve always liked drawing the best. I love lines and shapes in artwork; a flat page creating an illusion of depth or roundness. I’ve never had an aptitude for sculpture or anything three dimensional. I could never visualize what the other side of something looked like. And as I draw I don’t think about what the back of something or someone is shaped like because I’m too busy trying to draw relatively accurately what I’m looking so intensely at. I only care what it looks like on the paper, (and I love paper w/simple basic drawing media and tools.) I love the illusion (magic/trickery?) of flat (2D) art which I feel sculpture lacks (it’s too real…)   With drawing and painting we’re really just fooling the human brain-( a co-operative venture to be sure.)

    I guess the human form is my favorite subject to draw: life drawing and portraiture are the most challenging and rewarding subjects. I always draw each life drawing model/pose as a specific and unique person i.e. a portrait.

    I don’t like generic generalized drawings of humans in any form. I try so hard to make the drawing look accurate esp. in portraiture. I totally admire any artist who can capture something with an economy of means, including caricaturists and political cartoonists.

    My favorite artists and major influences are Asiatic art/calligraphy, Japanese woodcuts (w/ mt. fuji always!), Rembrandt, van Gogh, Egon Schiele, Picasso. Matisse and all the great draughtsmen. Also I am a huge fan of Betty Edwards book  ”Drawing on the Right side of the Brain” which is the best book on drawing (accurately!) there is. I also give drawing lessons based on this system.

  • July 2011

  • Winners and Losers new work by Michelle Marie Murphy

    “Winners and Losers” a solo exhibition of new works by
    Michelle Marie Murphy

    “USA Lottery Winner, Chris Shaw”

    Chris Shaw, a convenience store clerk of Missouri, won $258.5 million playing “Powerball” in April of 2010.

    ________________________________________________________________

    Michelle Marie Murphy creates multi-disciplinary visual art using the success and the tribulations of our roles in society as narrative. The source material chosen for these works are from real life social experiences, “America’s Funniest Home Videos”, and the Internet. Memorialized people at formative stages in their life (as seen in the series “Winners USA”) are equal players in Murphy’s oeuvre as those works where the subjects’ situation provides a critically poignant result (as seen in the series “America: a Comedy”). Hints of humor and tragedy can be found in the work providing further provocation.

    Michelle received her BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 2004. Her work has been published internationally, and she has exhibited in Geneva Switzerland, San Francisco, Chicago, and throughout the Midwest. Michelle works as a professional photographer at NASA (Glenn Research Center), and as an instructor at the Cleveland Institute of Art.

    http://michellemariemurphy.com/

  • Juxtaposition a collaboration by Christopher Kapsar and Justin Brennan Opens Friday Nov. 12th

    The artwork presented here is a collaboration between Chris Kaspar and Justin Brennan. What you see is a series of portraits, each set a separate interpretation of the same person. While the black and white photos are printed in the darkroom, they are then manipulated in two different ways. Justin Brennan uses acrylic paint, marker and pen to transform the photograph into a stylistic painting. Chris Kaspar uses inks, dyes, pens and bleach to transform the photograph into a stylized photograph.

    Justin Brennan and Chris Kaspar are Cleveland based artists living and working in the city. Both have received training from Kent State University, Cleveland State University and Cuyahoga Community College.

  • The Year of Skutnik – Calendar by David Skutnik

    Known as the most physically and mentally provocative take on time ever attempted- “The Year of Skutnik” is finally upon us… come and experience the climax of time, an exploration of masculinity and the most epic of epochs. Take a brief moment to embody a culture, year and an artist.

    It happens to be on National Pierogi Day ( which only makes sense) so there will be an assortment of pierogis, Miller High Life and scantily clad dudes to pleasure all of your many senses.

    With special guest DJ C. Randolph C. presiding at the opening ceremonies.

    The Skutnik 2011 Calendar will be on sale – may be the last calendar you will ever need.

  • T.V. Blondes and Boys with Guns – prints by Bruce Edwards

    Hand pulled serigraph prints of movie stars, these images are photographed from a TV screen then converted to screens for printing. That process creates prints that appear both grainy under close exam but as a rich and fully realized photograph at a distance.

    Edwards has been photographing current TV images, most notably during the 2008 presidential campaign, however this show’s installation paints a scene of classic blonds and men with guns that have graced movie screens throughout film history.

    This is Edwards fifth show at Brandt Gallery. His work questions the process of art making and the line between the act of making art and the actual object created.

  • Transparent Architecture work by Pete (Pedro) Dell

    P e t e “pedro” D e l l

    Seeker – Student – Photographer – Musician – Poet – Father – Grandfather – Husband

    Join me in a creative process that begins in my mind’s eye, enters through a lens, is captured by a chemical film, realized on paper, and interpreted by you. I hope to trigger a flow of emotions, questions, and ideas that contemplate mankind’s contribution to, and disruption of, the natural world.

    I strive to present works that tap into that space between one’s imagination and the “real” world. A photograph that is a factual representation of an object doesn’t impart the same excitement to me, as art that is open to interpretation.

    My favorite works often result from serendipitous errors that happen in the process of creation, or result from accidents of the mechanical processes. We live in a world of mistakes and errors, which serve to foster our imagination.

    Also featured at the opening Tremont ArtWalk Friday August 13 drumming performance Pete Dell and Scott Pickering.

  • Minimal Painting work by Edward Shalala


    Minimal Painting an exhibition by Edward Shalala opens at Brandt Gallery Tremont ArtWalk Friday June 11, 2010 runs through July 12.

    Shalala is continuing work that he began more than 30 years ago. While finishing his MFA he became compelled by the work of Lucio Fontana, specifically the work Fontana did with raw cut canvas and raw cut linen canvas paintings. This work is of special interest to Shalala. Fontana called his cut paintings ‘spatial concepts’. The raw cut canvas pushed the viewer to see the material, the canvas, as a painting in and of itself.

    Considering Fontana’s work, while in graduate school at the University of Wisconsin, with the use of minimal paint, then no paint; Shalala began using pieces of raw canvas, poking holes, using glue and then collage to create paintings without use of paint. Taking the process further Shalala began to use canvas thread as the medium in and of itself. He created outdoor paintings by using the canvas thread to define the space in an outdoor setting, for example a field or garden to spatially define the painting.

    The paintings are temporary, the color of the palette defined by space and light rather than pigment applied with brush. The paintings are super reductive painting recorded with documentary photography. The canvas unraveled is now a line rather than a plane. In this way Shalala returns the abstract painting back to the nature.

  • ART-WORKS-TALKS with Orange, Sopko and Luna


    On Friday, May 14, three Cleveland artists invite you to cozy on up to art, circle round it, stare into it like a backyard bonfire, take its pulse… Come on over and converse awhile in the very place where art, life and magic make their collective home.

    7:00 pm- Author and noise musician Tom Orange performs “The Well-Tuned Autoharp,” an original composition inspired by the music of La Monte Young.

    8:00 pm- Writer and custodian Kate Sopko riffs on feminist performance artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles and her long career looking into the meaning of maintenance work. Come by and take a minute looking at the deceivingly simple question, ‘Who Does Your Art/Work?’

    9:00 pm- Musician and DJ Jose Luna reprises an inter-media piece originally titled “Digital Detournement for Josef Albers” with an original, live ethno-electro-acoustic score.

  • My Love For you is not Defined by the Things I do not Tell You

    Collage by Phoebe Marie Nelson.

  • Curve Sets work by Jayce Renner, June 13 - July 3, 2009

  • Hungary 1967 - photography by David Novak

  • In Four Weeks work by Lauren Dombrowiak – January 11 - February 8, 2008


  • All That Glows is Glorious A Site Specific Illuminated Installation, January 1 – January 31, 2007

  • Anytime After Now work by Kenn Louis October 7 – November 4, 2006

  • The Dressmaker and the Tailor, work by Brenda Stumpf, July 8 - August 12, 2006

  • The Flower for Disappearing - paintings by Mark Keffer, November 20 - December 21, 2005

  • November 2005

  • Collage by Cushmere Bell, October 7 – 31 2004

    Article by Lyz Bly first printed in the Free Times October 2004

  • "Rosen Bridges Falling Down" paintings by Lisa Kenion, September 5 - October 5, 2004

  • Rust and Wishes work by Judith Brandon and Ben Parsons: August 30 – September 28, 2003

    September 5, 2003, Dan Tranberg special to the Plain Dealer.

  • May 2003

  • Paintings by Stephe D. K. September 13 - October 12, 2002

  • Craig Robertson Paintings March 2001

  • December 1998

  • July - August 1998, Rags of Light work by Ben Parsons

  • Spaces - sculpture by Terry Durst / Stir by Still sculpture by Jeesun Park

  • Carving – Bruce Edwards, March 21 – April 21, 1997

  • SPEC; what to see by ROY BIGLER, November 8 - December 14, 1996

  • sleeps with angel food cakes an installation by terry durst friday july 12 - july 28, 1996

  • Work by Bruce Edwards, February 14 - March 23, 2003

  • Fabulous Ruins photography by Jim Clinefelter and Denis Cox, May 12 – June 3, 1994

  • "Fabulous Ruins" photography by Jim Clinefelter and Denise Cox, May 13 - June 3, 1994

  • Paintings by Stephanie R. Haynes April 1 - May 23, 1993

  • Your Vote Counts T.V. Repair Shop installation by Beth Wolfe Tuesday November 3 – December 13, 1992

  • Editorial Mural by Mikel Mahoney, September 11 - October 25, 1992

  • Sound Installation by Charlotte Pressler and Black Velvet art curated by Jay Clements opened June 7, 1991

  • Paintings by Craig Robertson, February 15 – March 31, 1991

  • Old Stuff - a ten year retrospective of work by Terry Durst, September 28 - December 31, 1990

Comments are closed.